Wines Similar To White Zinfandel: 6 Alternatives To Choose From

Zinfandel is an underrated and misunderstood grape, but don’t let its reputation as “White Zin” fool you.

This red grape has been giving people headaches since the 1970s when it became popular with couples on summer nights looking to drink something light yet still sweet enough for their tastes (and not yours). It`s an off-dry to sweet rose wine which is the result of a stuck fermentation.

But now we’re here today talking about how there’s more than one type of Zinfandaintendo, the full-bodied jammy kind that even serious wine drinkers enjoy.

About White Zinfandel Wine

White Zinfandel wine is a popular and light-bodied variety of wine that is made from the Zinfandel grape. It’s often described as sweet, slightly sparkling, and with a fruity bouquet. The wine is made from is wonderfully complex and floral aromatics, medium-high acidity dessert grape variety,

White Zinfandel has become more popular throughout the United States and Southern France in recent years, especially amongst younger drinkers who find it an easy-drinking option.

White Zinfandel dessert wine is a great match for many different foods and can be enjoyed by itself as a casual drink with friends or out at a restaurant.

It’s also frequently used in cooking because of its strong sweet rich flavors which enhance the taste of food.

How To Serve White Zinfandel Properly

If you’re looking to enhance your enjoyment of White Zinfandel, it’s important to learn how to serve it properly. Here are a few tips:

  • White Zinfandel is best served chilled but not ice cold. This allows the flavors of the wine to come through more fully.
  • When pouring, hold the bottle at an angle so that only a small amount of wine is poured into each glass. This helps the wine to stay fresh and sparkling.
  • White Zinfandel fine wine is commonly paired with foods like cheese, salmon, chicken, posole, seafood, and barbecue because of its sweet flavor. It’s also a great pairing option for desserts like cake and pie.

Wines Similar To White Zinfandel: 6 Alternatives To Choose From

White zinfandel is a sweet, fruity rose wine that has become incredibly popular in the United States. If you are looking to enjoy a similar type of wine or just want to try something different, here

Chenin Blanc

A versatile white wine, Chenin Blanc is produced in a wide variety of styles depending on the region it comes from.

It can be dry and mineral-driven like those from the Loire Valley, or rich and honeyed like those from South Africa. Overall, it shares many characteristics with White Zinfandel, including its fruity aromas and slightly sweet flavor. The refreshing and elegant flavors of white sweet wine are heightened by a light touch that provides just enough aroma to keep it interesting.

Chenin Blancs, which can be dry or sweet depending on how they’re made, do this well with their simple yet complex profile consisting mainly of fruit – apples, in particular, seem prevalent when drinking them.

Moscato d’Asti

This light, sparkling wine from Italy’s Piedmont region is a great alternative to White Zinfandel. It has similar floral and fruit aromas, but with a characteristic fizziness that makes it refreshing and fun to drink.

These inviting and fruity red grapes have been a favorite of mine since my days as an undergraduate.

The body is full of notes that are reminiscent of those found in its white counterpart, but they come courtesy of enough complexity for it not to be boring or forgettable at all.

Gewürztraminer

Aromatic and full-bodied, Gewürztraminer is another good alternative to White Zinfandel.

It shares many of the same floral and spice notes but is typically a bit drier than White Zinfandel. Treasured by wine lovers for its perfume and flavor, Gewürztraminer is a seriously tempting choice.

This white gold can be found in many different regions across France but it’s most popular on grapes grown just outside of a liable village called Auxerre where they have been cultivating this grape since 1588.

Riesling

The Riesling grape is one of Germany’s most famous, and the country produces some truly amazing wines. Riesling is a versatile white wine grape that can be made in a wide variety of styles. It is often quite fruity, but can also be bone-dry and minerally.

Overall, it makes for a refreshing alternative to White Zinfandel.

Grenache Blanc

The Grenache Blanc is a typically French style of wine. It`s a variety of the red Grenache grape. It has notes that are fruity on their own but can also have some levels of spice, especially in its youth when it’s less developed than other varieties like Syrah (which will develop more after being aged). This type was created by peasants who wanted to avoid paying taxes so they could make better quality table wines with what would otherwise just be used for cooking food.

A lesser-known white grape, Grenache Blanc shares many of the same characteristics as White Zinfandel. It is typically light-bodied, with fresh notes of citrus and stone fruit.

Pinot Grigio

One of the most popular white wine grapes in the world, Pinot Grigio has a light body and refreshing flavors that make it a delicious alternative to White Zinfandel. It shares many of the same citrus, green apple, and spice notes, but is typically drier than White Zinfandel due to its lighter body.

Italy is famous for its wine, but not all wines are created equal. Pinot Grigio hail from the north and central Italy where they’re made in a light style with hints of sweetness.

Conclusion

Now that you know a little more about White Zinfandel and some of the dry wines that make good substitutes, we hope you’ll give them a try. If you’re looking for a wine to pair with food, any of these options should work well.

Any of the sweet dessert wines mentioned above can be used in any recipe for spicy dishes (mild cheeses, hard cheeses, cured meats) and any other food pairing.

And if you’re just in the mood for something different, one of these alternatives may just hit the spot.

Happy drinking!

Christina Day
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